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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
safe? not just school environments, but in our community where we will not have these fears? where we will not be afraid of mass shootings and these assault weapons, which are so rampant in this country today. >> sean burke, which like to respond to the ad that says are the president is more important than yours, then why is skeptical about putting on a secured in our schools when his kids are protected by armed guards? do you think this is a pro. ? >> good morning. i also do not like anything that is done out of fear. i do not think fear is going to be good for school safety and i don't think it is good for the and states. i don't think it will produce anything that will be positive in the way of changes in school safety. i don't think it is inappropriate at to be running in the u.s., no. >> can you elaborate your responses to the newtown shooting and what you think ought to be done to increase safety in schools, sean burke? >> first of all, we promote reasonableness. i don't think there is call to go off on wild tangents or go out of the norm with a lot of ideas that are coming that
whole and total package. for years i have said, to have a growing economy and a just social environment, we needed to make as americans, critical investments. you hit three of those critical investments. you talked about research. absolutely critical investment in the future growth of the economy, and to solve today and tomorrow's problems. that's research, most of which, interestingly, is funded directly by the federal government, by the national institutes of health, darpa or one of the other federal agencies or indirectly through the research tax credit that we provide for businesses to engage in research. so research being one of the investments that lead to economic growth. you mentioned the second one, very interesting, and that's education. well-educated work force will be competitive across the world. that is the most critical investment. again, a role for the federal government, certainly a role for states and local governments, but a role for the american society that cannot be ignored. research education. and you drew it very, very correctly, and that is the manufacturing tha
on a dime and now we're moving into a completely different environment. it's not an environment so different that all of these things are going to happen. and an assault weapons ban is sill a heavy lift. remember, the assault weapons ban we had had a lot of loopholes in it. but the other elements, it's just a different world. and i think national rifle association is no longer supreme in the same way and many of their own members i think are going to start to feel differently. when you get a joe manchin of west virginia coming out and saying "i hunt, i don't need more than three bullets in a magazine" and you get other long-standing strong proponents of the second amendment saying it's time for some changes, we're moving into a different world. >> brown: david kopel, do you think the politics have changed here or do you expect -- well, there certainly will be challenges legislatively. will there also be challenges legally? >> there will certainly be legal challenges because one important thing -- the way things have changechanged is we now have the supreme court having affirmed that the seco
. >> reporter: still, some conservative christians say the focus shouldn't be on guns, but on the environment giving rise to this violence. >> instead of having as the nra proposes a policeman in every school. getting a dad in every home. >> reporter: vice president biden said he's glad that evangelical groups participated in his meetings because in the past, they have been reluctant to engage on the gun issue." athena jones, cnn, washington. >>> time for a little introduction. i want you to take a look here. this is my cat, browser. he's at home right now watching the show, no doubt. but he's pretty cute and cuddly. i spoil him rotten, but could he be plotting something sinister? could he be plotting to kill me? doesn't look like it there. we'll talk about it next with the author of "how to tell if your cat is trying to kill you." about health care... s i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a
around policy uncertainty. there are many who believe that the uncertain environment that is prevalent in the nation's capital is adding to some of those concerns. we certainly hear from some of -- small-business customers and others who do not know what their tax rates are going to be or what areas the government may cut back on spending. it is a difficult position for people to wait in. even if they are seen profitability and growth in their business, they are trying to get by with what they haven't been rather than commit to -- with what a house rather than commit to new investments. >> you know how much of a world of participation rate is going to play in unemployment going forward? we have seen a sort of stabilization. will it hit the bottom? and have all of the we're factors played out and now it is just demographics? >> one dindane -- one thing that surprised everybody and one of the reasons we have had a lot of progress on the unemployment rate is past years we have not seen a lot of people re-enter the labour force. participation rates have been pretty much trending down. ther
? that is a very rich interest level, in our current interest- rate environment. you have to wonder if the bank is not just holding on to your loan to maintain a high level of interest? but i wonder if this may be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstance to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all of the bad loans that they made during the real-estate mania. >> one other issue that was brought up was the issue of debt-income ratio, and this is something richard spoke about and what he would do with the qualified loans. american hero joe says, what did he mean by 20% of the grossly month in come? explain this issue for us? >> this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan issue, that described a little bit ago. we don't want people taking on loans they cannot afford to repay, that leads us to problems. what they have decided is that 43% is the outside level, if your mortgage debt, plus or other debt, with car loans or consumer debt or credit cards, -- if your other obliga
attacks, the united states is susceptible to that environment. it's not only here in the united states but u.s. interests around the world. and that's why the u.s. has to maintain or believes it has to maintain that presence there. there's no doubt that going forward many of these issues are going to come to the surface. afghanistan could find itself in a very bloody civil war. iraq after the u.s. withdrawal has not gotten necessarily better. there's still violence. there are still attacks. but to some extent u.s. interests are a little more secured as a result of what happened there in the eyes of, you know, the united states officials that pursued that war. so again, you could make the argument that in afghanistan something similar could happen. but there's no doubt a great deal of uncertainty, great deal of questions remain. as to whether or not the central government in afghanistan can actually control the military and preserve the security, integrity of that country. and that remains to be seen. >> if only we could predict the future. all right, ayman, good to see you. >> thanks a
into the international environment, which makes it more complex, but let me use that as a segue. we know and hear about economic impact repeatedly, but who speaks for the environment, and how can we keep that the boys drowned out as a difference for -- voice from being drowned out as a result of a difference of relationships? how do we close the cycle of latency and try to understand where we need information? >> let me start with a comment you made, which i found to be fascinating, that there is between a $11 and $30 for every dollar spent. an ounce of prevention is worth every cure. that is a 16 fold ratio. we know that. our policy has to put that in place. we need a baseline. of course we do. the only thing forcing the baseline is smart companies, and they may as well get a baseline, because they will show we started which dirty water, but there are no resources to get the baseline. we know we need to drill the northeast over the next couple days. -- decades. we need that baseline. we need it desperately, and we needed for human health as well. lots of different communities have different kinds of d
're in a completely different environment, and obama did pretty well working from the outside in on the fiscal cliff thing, and now the sense is he is nott going to win on the assault bans. he might do better on the magazines. he is quite likely to get some sort of victory in terms of the background checks. why not run this up the hill, get a yes or no vote and build in political capital for future fights. >> future fights on unrelated issues or -- >> on this issue, but also building up sort of this whole reagan-esque argument. the richard newstat book about this, about the power of the presidency, it was kind of bill clinton's bible. obama seems to be moving forwards that away from the deal cutting. >> maria theresa, glen is talking long game, but in terms of the short game, the playbook seems to be one that he has used a lot in the last couple of months/year, i'll say, which is vault over congress and take it to the people and make them move however incrementally. the question is do we think is that can happen? can he have that kind of win on gun control 1234. >> he did exactly what he should have
unemployment rate, none of which reflect a good economic environment. our goal is to have economic growth and create jobs. that's what we were elected to do. bill: we've seen in other states, florida for years, texas as well. what you would do is you would tax things that are currently not being taxed by the state, such as certain legal fees, accounting fees, spa services, and food. ultimately what would you get out of it? >> well, you have to look at some serious points. consumption-based sales and use tax very broad based on both goods and service efs is s is a very good economic driver as compared to the negative effect of income taxes which is a detriment to economic growth and jobs. what we believe is to expand the sales tax basin to goods and services, that is something that would absolutely create business activity, and therefore income and gdp growth and with that we were going to get rid of completely the negative taxes, which would be income taxes, both personal and corporate, and what that does is it will create jobs. bill: okay, now we -- i know you believe it's got a pretty g
environment, both parties are a little more subdued. republicans are panicky after two bad elections in a roam democrats don't have quite the same enthusiasm. but they're happy to be in their position. much better shape than republicans. >> heather: scott, you mentioned your marriage. four years in, you're still kind of a newly wed. you're still supposed to be excited about what is to come. how do the american people about this? we're headed into the second term for the president. are people optimistic? >> well, they're a little more optimistic than theygo. when the president first took office, 27% said the country was heading in the right direction. now it's up to 36%. on the day he was sworn in, four years ago, 35% said their finances were in good shape. it's up to 39% today. so progress, but people aren't really excited yet. there is still a lot of concerns to be dealt with. >> gregg: let's talk about the second amendment. you conducted a poll on that. what did you find? >> 65% of american voters, out of american adults, two out of three, say the reason we have a second amendment is so the
and certainly in the schools as well i think we can have a much safer community and environment for our kids than we have now. >> marc klaas joining us this morning. marc the father of polly klaas and the founder of the klaas kids foundation. thanks for talking to us. we appreciate your time this morning. >> thank you so much. >> many people pointed out that it appears in the video the little girl goes so easily with her mother, her mother wears a burqa and so maybe she didn't know it was her mother. kids that age will go with an adult. their whole lives are -- their lives -- >> right. >> i picked one of my friend's kids from tae kwon do, and they didn't ask where is mom and dad, where are we going, it's one of the things you have to be so careful that what kind of adults are around and i was amazed that an adult can stroll into a school and out with a child like this. >> children don't ask, okay, because their whole lives are built around, you go to that now, you do this now, i think it's really a terrifying thing that the people didn't say to you, i don't care if he says he knows you, i ne
, not the rules you wish you had. so in this environment where republicans are spending hundreds of millions of dollars to try to defeat health care reform, you have to ask the question -- well, what are democrats going to do? who are progressives going to do to make sure our voices and values aren't droubed out because of the system we're in right now? >> you know what? we have to overturn citizens united. we need a constitutional amendment to do that and we need public financing of campaigns but i agree with bill. until we get there and the public has to push to get us there, we have to defeat some of the very -- this agenda that is really destroying the country and also, our democracy. it's making the voices of ordinary people, what is happening now, this undisclosed corporate money in politics is shrinking the democratic process and allowing corporations to dominate the political agenda and the voices of the american people are being diminished. >> so what are we going to do bt it? you've been very outspoken open this. you saw a ton of outside money too come into your race. i feel like w
proportionally because it was a real working-class environment which i grew up. so you didn't have mounds of food on your plate. and there were no snacks in our house. we didn't have potato chips or cookies. my mother would bake cookies once a week and then you'd have them as a treat. it was a whole different eating plan even though we were knocking back cokes all day long. >> with all due respect, i've heard this from joe, that's great that you ran all day. wonderful. that about the kids over the past 10, 20, 30 years who drank five cokes a day and didn't do that. >> is that coke's fault? that's the question. >> actually, it's part of a bigger problem just like the gun debate, okay? >> look, i have friends at coca-cola and friends at most of the soft drink companies. i think you've got to give them credit for at least putting this out there and saying obesity is an issue in america, and calories do count, and we're now talking about it as a result of them doing that. and it probably will generate some kind of a dialogue. >> i'll give them credit skeptically because i think they're covering thems
. frankly we need legislation that makes it a crime. unsafe environment, those kind of things, but is that really getting at the particular issue? i don't think it does. and sometimes they have to be able to be creative to do that. in a regard to domestic violence. absolutely. here's what we could do with that. first of all, and forgive me for saying the obvious, but nix is a wonderful thing. i'm sorry, ncic. they're both wonderful things. but ncic is a wonderful thing but anything with a serial number goes in there, too like a toaster, if you have one. it's not necessarily a go-to database. i think you're right on and i think that those people should go into the nix system right away and i think that what we need is then funding for crisis teams. because a lot of times, and even when guns and often is the case are not involved but someone needs some help and an officer rolls up at 3:00 in the morning and they are very limited in the resources that are available to them. if there is funding for properly trained crisis intervention people, there we go. now we got something. no
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)